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New systematic review and meta-analysis on effectiveness of WASH interventions

Researchers at the Emory Rollins School of Public Health, in collaboration with the WHO, UNICEF, and others recently published (July, 2022) a systematic review and meta-analysis on effectiveness of WASH interventions.

This meta-analysis provided up-to-date estimates on the burden of diseases attributed to WASH. The two previous systematic reviews were published in 2014 and 2018. This new systematic-review included 124 studies (83 observations for water, 20 for sanitation and 41 for hygiene).

The main quantitative findings are summarized below:
When compared with unimproved water source, the reduction in risk of diarrhoea were:

  • 52% for improved drinking water on premises with higher water quality
  • 50% for water filtered at Point-of-Use (POU)
  • 21% for basic sanitation without sewer connection
  • 47% for basic sanitation with sewer connection
  • 30% for hygiene interventions.

Sex-disaggregated data is very limited in WASH context, only 4% of the included studies. (In my opinion, this is a huge data gap).

Highlights, impressions and suggestions from this meta-analysis:

  1. Drinking water of higher quality and water filtered at POU are effective (up to around 50%) in reducing diarrheal risk.
  2. Basic sanitation services without sewer connection were associated with a moderate reduction in risk of diarrhoea.
  3. Sewered sanitation has a greater effect on health than on-site sanitation. (there are several explanations for this suggestion)
  4. The risk reduction of diarrhoeal disease from handwashing interventions is impressive.

It is an open access paper.

What do you think about their findings? Surprising?

Journal reference:

Wolf, J., et al. (2022) Effectiveness of interventions to improve... (More)

Humanitarian Water Engineering Online Intensive Course - Applications Open!

Humanitarian Water Engineering. 7 September - 2 December 2022 online intensive. Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research, Lassonde School of Engineering, Advanced Disaster, Emergency and Rapid Response Simulation, York University
Humanitarian Water Engineering. 7 September - 2 December 2022 online intensive. Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health Research, Lassonde School of Engineering, Advanced Disaster, Emergency and Rapid Response Simulation, York University

We are excited to announce our second offering of the Humanitarian Water Engineering Intensive Online Course starting this September!

The Humanitarian Water Engineering Intensive Course offers participants an opportunity to gain essential knowledge and skills on safe water supply in humanitarian emergencies. The course covers the theoretical fundamentals of, and practical considerations for, the design and operation of water supply systems in humanitarian response. 
 
Over the course of twelve weeks this Autumn, participants will engage in a rich, multifaceted online learning experience consisting of lectures from experienced practitioners and engineering faculty, problem-based learning activities guided by talented facilitators,‚ÄĮand¬†curated readings.¬†¬†
 
Members of our inaugural 2021 cohort have gone on to start or advance in their careers as Water & Sanitation Specialists‚ÄĮin the humanitarian sector.‚ÄĮ

The course will run from 7th September to 2nd December and applications can be made online until 31st August. To learn more about the course and what our past participants have to say, please visit our website hwe.dighr.org/

How are you sampling methods?

We recently conducted a hands-on workshop about Drinking Water Quality Testing in Liberia. Here we have pictured Environmental Health Technicians from National Public Health Institute of Liberia practicing good sample collection methods. What are your best safe sampling techniques?